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  • C1 Pinout drawing

    Finished the C1 drawing.

    The base for this came from a drawing made by Felix dated 2006.

    Thanks Felix.
    image_1119.jpg



    If you see any errors or have any comments, please post them.

    PinCup
    Last edited by Mike Wilson; 11-23-2017, 12:51 AM.
    We leave our greatest mark on this earth with the quality of our craftsmanship.

  • #2
    Re: C1 Pinout drawing

    Here is my comment, PinCup... Nice job! I mean really... That looks great. Mind if I save that to file?

    Lonnie
    "Efficiency is, doing better what is already being done!"
    Pinsetter Technical Services 214-505-7663

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: C1 Pinout drawing

      Very nice....this should be in the manual.

      Just hung this up at my workbench, this and the C2 sheet, these will make things much easier.

      Thank you!

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: C1 Pinout drawing

        No..Thank You

        PinCup, your C 1 pinout drawing is just Awesome! And "Much Appreciated"

        felix


        We should add Triac's Drawing to this page also. And C2/ Whatcha think?
        If at first you don't succeed, try, try, again. Then quit. There's no use being a damn fool about it." -W.C.Fields

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: C1 Pinout drawing

          Originally posted by Lonnie_Mitchell
          Here is my comment, PinCup... Nice job! I mean really... That looks great. Mind if I save that to file?

          Lonnie
          That's why I'm re-doing these drawings, for everyone to have and use.

          I'll repost them (C1 C2A) in the AMF Picture section soon.

          I plan to make another for the table and sweep contacts too.


          PinCup
          We leave our greatest mark on this earth with the quality of our craftsmanship.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: C1 Pinout drawing

            ^That will be awesome.

            What about T1?

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: C1 Pinout drawing

              46AA is the added wire to the BE relay...on most chassis I have ever seen

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: C1 Pinout drawing

                Just a quick thought. Why couldn't you take and double up on the 110v input pins via 43M and 48KK to help with the high current draw related to the motors and the over all chassis power requirements? Could help stop the burning up of these pins.
                AMF DOCTOR
                The doctor makes house calls.
                http://s427.photobucket.com/home/AMFDOCTOR/index

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: C1 Pinout drawing

                  What is auto sweep reverse?
                  So it goes.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: C1 Pinout drawing

                    Originally posted by Lampie
                    What is auto sweep reverse?
                    It is the quick cycle feature when MP chassis' are connected
                    with automatic scoring. Strike and gutter/7-10 pickoff cycles
                    are made much faster.
                    Prevent the problems. Don't do crash repairs.

                    Drywall in a bowling center: Recipe for disaster.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: C1 Pinout drawing

                      Originally posted by AMFDOCTOR
                      Just a quick thought. Why couldn't you take and double up on the 110v input pins via 43M and 48KK to help with the high current draw related to the motors and the over all chassis power requirements? Could help stop the burning up of these pins.
                      As I mentioned in another post, the problem with the 110v power in an MP chassis is that everything demanding 110V is tied together via jumpers. This means that you have to disconnect each 110V input to test continuity, otherwise if only 1 of the 3 wires carrying 110V into the chassis has a good connection, all of them will show a continuity. If you simply add 2 more wires that won't stop burnouts, as what is happening is as each pin looses continuity, more power is being pushed though fewer wires until all demand is going though one causing it to overheat/melt/etc.

                      I've decided to split 110V inputs to 5 wires and to eliminate all 110V jumpers. Currently there is a jumper from the BE switch to the sweep contactor, from the sweep contactor to the table contactor, and from the sweep contactor to the T2 primary. T1/T3/T4 primaries are powered via the C2A-26b which comes from CB-B; CB-A is powered from C2A-18j which is jumped from C1-41C. I've decided to make these changes to make troubleshooting easier and to ensure that each wire has a duty rating far greater than the demand.

                      41C sweep 110V In, 42H table 110V IN, 46AA T2 Primary 110V IN, and 47EE BE Motor 110V IN... all of these come directly from TS-18. CB-B will be powered directly from TS-18 and go into the chassis via 43M T1 Primary 110V IN (To be extra cute, I'm sending CB-A to TS-6, and then to C1-43M; again for troubleshooting purposes). Although this requires some rewiring in the wireway and the chassis I feel it's well worth it to eliminate what seems to be the more common electrical failure, burnt out 110V IN pins on the C1... I'm rewiring all 110V lines with 600V 14GA UL1015 hook-up wire. PLEASE NOTE: If you want to do a good job and eliminate electrical issues, you should purchase the special crimping tool for the AMP connector pins. Yeah, it's pricey, but there is simply no substitute for a properly crimped pin...
                      82-70 MP Pinsetters+Humpback/Light Ball Clutch/Rocket Rails
                      *Monitor repair for Steltronic Elex/SuperElex system! Send me PM!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: C1 Pinout drawing

                        The Line wiring pins of the chassis should be connected together, run through a toroid, connected to a circuit breaker, and attached to a terminal strip. The wires requiring a line connection and be connected. The same applies to the neutral wires. That way you would have a distribution system. The connected pins would share the total load together. If 4 pins are used for each input the resistance would be reduced to 1/4. The pins would not burn out. We have a C1 connecter that is 3 years modified and the pins look brand new. Crimping and SOLDERING is best.
                        A Band-Aid will not last, it waits for another one.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: C1 Pinout drawing

                          Why are you running them through a torroid?
                          I've had enough of hope & chains.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: C1 Pinout drawing

                            The concept of using multiple wires to "share" the load makes good intuitive sense, but is flawed because of a couple of reasons. Even though the load seems to be shared, for every cycle of AC power, the entire load is following an unique path through the wiring. Electricity will always take the path of least resistance and inevitably as more time goes by, loads of 16 amps or more will corrupt connections. As connections fail, fewer wires have to handle an increasing load until a single wire is handling the entire load. It will be difficult to know that this is happening because since all hots are interconnected, they will all show continuity unless each one is disconnected. It's important to note that this process may take a very long time to play out, but my machines are 35+ years old and definitely show the signs of poor power engineering and even poorer maintenance techniques, lol. (I "inherited" them 2 years ago) In a nutshell, this is WHY it's a standard practice to upgrade the duty rating of a wire as demand increases rather than adding additional lines regardless of the application. For example, if you were upgrading power at your house for a new 40 amp electric oven, you wouldn't just run another 20 amp line and tie it together with the existing 20 amp line; you would remove the existing 20 amp line and replace it with a 40 amp line .

                            Standard 16 gauge, 600V wiring and standard AMP pins are more than adequate to handle the max 6 amp load that one motor demands. But three motors, 4 transformers and the pit lights together are well more for which any one "pathway" is rated to handle. I'm upgrading my high power wiring to 14 gauge for even greater reliability and because it's really not a significant difference in the cost of the wire. I really don't think there is any better way than for each load to have it's own isolated hot into the chassis and an isolated neutral where applicable. It makes troubleshooting easy and ensures that no single wire will ever have to carry more power than that for which it is rated.

                            Yeah, soldering does make the best connection, but the crimp tool is designed to create a connection that is rated for a 15 amp load - more than is necessary. I only mention this because there are a lot of pins, and depending on how many machines one has it could be a ridiculous amount of time to solder every connection

                            I'm also confused by the use of a toroid for this application.
                            82-70 MP Pinsetters+Humpback/Light Ball Clutch/Rocket Rails
                            *Monitor repair for Steltronic Elex/SuperElex system! Send me PM!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: C1 Pinout drawing

                              A toroid will dampen the spike caused by a collapsing inductive field which is what motors are. It will minimize the high voltage spike. The electronics in the chassis is in a hazardous environment. The constant vibrations, ball/pin impacts will enentually cuase connection failures. I have no idea what you were trying to say about my "flawed". The load is shared at the connector pins.
                              A Band-Aid will not last, it waits for another one.

                              Comment

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