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Preventative Maintenance - Brunswick Jets, A2 - Ball Rod Cover Install

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  • Preventative Maintenance - Brunswick Jets, A2 - Ball Rod Cover Install

    Install new AP Rod Covers by yourself. I’ve always done mine in the machine and I understand it’s probably easier to do in a vice on the bench but I just don’t like going through those extra steps and the assembly is so heavy for an old fart. Also, I have to remove the Cotter Pin from the Clapper Block,(Old Style), which is also a real pain unless the block has been modified with the Hitch Pin, (Pic 9). I start by clamping the clapper block which greatly helps direct all the energy into pushing the rod cover on, (Pic 1). Cut off the old cover, (Pic 2), and cut the old cover “short” so less new cover is needed to be pushed on, nothing happens on this part of the assembly anyway, (Pic 3). Thoroughly clean the rod and remove all burrs, (Pic 4). I use a very light coating of the “Wire Ease - Clear Guide” on the rods with a little heavier coating at the bend and place a small amount in the beginning of the cover, (Pic 10 & 11). Blow the first section on as far as it will go. I found the big key here was the optimum air pressure. Too much the cover wants to blow back off and you are fighting it too much, (especially when you are doing it by yourself). Too little, it doesn’t want to slide over at the bend. 35 PSI at the gauge turned out to be the best for this application. Remove the air fitting and slide it the rest of the way on without air, yes it will slide right on with just the Wire Ease, (Pic 5 & 6). Blow the second piece on, (Pic 6 & 7). Cut to length and reassemble, (Pic 8). I always leave the opposite rod attached to the pin to hold the assembly up. Pic 9 is the hitch pin mod which is easily removed in case you want to pull the entire assembly out and do it in the vise,(you usually cannot get the assembly out by sliding it off the bearings as it hits the pit cushion). The inner, (or front) cover is a little more difficult because of the tighter bend. Sometimes I drop the curtain and crawl in the shaker. You then have a lot more leverage. So this is how an old fart gets the rod covers on by himself. Before using the "Clear Guide", it would take 2 or 3 of us fighting like heck, probably a good half hour to get one rod cover on. Once the prep work was done, it probably took me less than 5 minutes to do both covers. This lube also works very well with the Tan,(Gum Rubber), Cover. I slid one of those on by myself at my friends center with a small amount of air also. I use the left over cover on my SBE's which should now last forever. You can get 2 SBE's done with the piece left over from the rear cover.

    Ball Rod 1 C.jpgBall Rod 2 C.jpgBall Rod 3 C.jpgBall Rod 4 C.jpgBall Rod 5 C.jpgBall Rod 6 C.jpgBall Rod 7 C.jpgBall Rod 8 C.jpgBall Rod 9 C.jpgWire Ease C.jpgWire Ease 2 C.jpg
    Everything has to be Somewhere !!

  • #2
    Is it me or is that inner rod broken?

    I don't mind taking ours out. Gives me a chance to clean/replace the oilites. We also do both at once using baby powder.

    Thanks for sharing, and the pictures.
    Factory & Converted A-2 (US, Ger, Jap)
    Comscore ECT, Matrix & DuoHD
    Walker B, Sanction Standard & Original K
    Kegel C.A.T.S

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    • #3
      Nothing gets past you James LOL. While waiting for another center owner to arrive I so I could train him on how to install one of these, I put the rear one on by myself. If you look at Pic 2 & 4, it wasn't broke yet. Later found out it was cracked half way through and broke the rest of the way while I installed the rear cover. I did notice it was drooping a bit but didn't catch it as the cap was semi holding it together. When the owner arrived and removed the inner cap, it fell apart. We removed the assembly, slid the new covers off and reused them on my spare assembly and reinstalled with all new covers. ughhh

      Good point though on the oilites. I've got the one piece lift arm assembly, (which isn't even shown in some of the drawings), which is very stable and believe it or not, I've never had to replace any of the oilites and they are 60+ years old. I'm using that 90-140 moly oil to lube them. (And he still hasn't replaced the broken turret wire on the rear walls which I told him about) You've got to try this Clear Guide, it really makes it easy to slide the AP covers on. It totally dries out after a month or two making the covers "solid" on the rods.
      Everything has to be Somewhere !!

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      • #4
        Lol. At first I thought it was the camera angle.

        Are you going to weld it? Done properly it can last indefinitely.

        We also have the one piece arms in my home centre, along with six with two piece. Yes, they are very stable. I was looking at making a metal clamp to join the two arm set-ups. Still on the back burner unfortunately.
        Factory & Converted A-2 (US, Ger, Jap)
        Comscore ECT, Matrix & DuoHD
        Walker B, Sanction Standard & Original K
        Kegel C.A.T.S

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        • #5
          I have welded them in the past with good success but have sold my stick welder. Cut this in half to make sliding the brand new rod covers off the rear rod to be used on the replacement. Friend gives me used ones for free. Finished installation (Pic 1) and restored SBE (Pic 2). I put a mod on the set screw to stop it wearing into the block or spacer, (depending which one you have). I used old parts from the spring loaded snubbers when they were replaced with the solid ones. Could use the "Spring Seat" from the trip pedal also. Little Lubriplate under it and good to go (Pic 3).
          Also put a mod to the SBE adjustment screw to cut down on wear, (Pic 4 & 5). Basically the same concept, used old style lock nuts installed backwards. The final two pics show covers that were put on over 2 1/2 years ago, (Pic 6 & 7). Note the lack of wear. The bend area is just starting to discolor. Still working with two companies in an attempt to get a 6 foot long piece of rod cover equal to the Brunswick AP cover.

          Ball Rod 12 C.jpgBall Rod 10 C .jpgBall Rod 11 C.jpgSBE 1 C.jpgSBE 2 C.jpgBall Rod Wear 1 C.jpgBall Rod Wear 2 C.jpg
          Everything has to be Somewhere !!

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          • #6
            On making a solid block... I don't know if the lift arm assemblies and spacer are steel. If they are, grind the spacer for a "Full Penetration" weld to turn it into a solid assembly. I've seen a lot of welds that are not welded all the way through, full penetration, only surface welded. These will eventually fail as the "crack" that exists between the metal and where the weld ends will split.
            Everything has to be Somewhere !!

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            • #7
              With A2 cushions and the one piece arms all that's needed to remove the lift rod assembly is to remove the x pin from the top of the shock. Or the bolt if it's an A2 cushion mounted on A kickbacks with mini kit. With the A2 arms and spacer I can slide off one arm and then the spacer and slide the other arm forward enough. I don't think the lift rod "oilites" are oilites. They look to me like cast bronze bearings. They also don't move enough to generate the heat that would be needed for an oilite to give up oil under load. So I grease them. I had 24 lanes of them that had not worn in about 20 years when the place closed. I was going through a 50 foot roll of rod cover about every 3 years and greasing them when I took them out to re-cover. I do usually re-cover one side at a time if only one side needs it so that would make the greasing more often.

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              • #8
                You are right MBW. I just call everything Oilites but they are bronze bearings and the 90/140 moly oil I use is technically a "grease". When you put it on, it stays there for darn near forever. So does the newer BelraY MA-1500 HEAVY I've started using in the gearboxes. It sticks forever. I don't know how removing the x-pin from the shock allows the pit cushion to move forward enough to slide the ball lift rod assembly to clear it. With the Clear Guide it is very easy to do the covers in the machine. Mine are 60+ years old and haven't replaced a bronze bearing yet.
                Everything has to be Somewhere !!

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                • #9
                  I've always removed thd rods. Don't really know why, guess it was the way I was taught. Basically follow the same procedure as posted above but, have used both, cheap talcum powder or dishwashing detergent. Though I strongly suspect the detergent deteriorates the gum rubber from the inside out.

                  i did experiment back in the 80's with a local rubber manufacturer making the rubber tube. It was impossible to put on, just too rigid. Had to cut and zip tie on.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by mickeygm View Post
                    You are right MBW. I just call everything Oilites but they are bronze bearings and the 90/140 moly oil I use is technically a "grease". When you put it on, it stays there for darn near forever. So does the newer BelraY MA-1500 HEAVY I've started using in the gearboxes. It sticks forever. I don't know how removing the x-pin from the shock allows the pit cushion to move forward enough to slide the ball lift rod assembly to clear it. With the Clear Guide it is very easy to do the covers in the machine. Mine are 60+ years old and haven't replaced a bronze bearing yet.
                    My way applies to A2 cushions. The cushion only moves forward a little but it's enough. I haven't worked with A pit cushions.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The first pic is showing both kinds of lift arms since some mechanics only work with one kind. The A2 style on the left is missing the spacer that goes between the arms. The second pic is how I tighten the collars on the stud. Get the adjustment right so the ball is centered on the ball wheel at the top of the lift rods, tighten the bolt on one collar, and use the vise grip C clamp to pull the collars together before tightening the bolt for the other collar.

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                      • #12
                        Hey Mickey is that the brunswick lift rod material that your using? I want to start changing over to that . I had one lift rod years ago done with it and the damn thing lasted forever
                        If its still broken, guess it wasnt in the parts budget.

                        Z

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                        • #13
                          Yes it is MR Z. Brunswick AP Rod Cover. The last two pics in post #5 are over 2 1/2 years old. No wear yet. Keeping fingers crossed.
                          Everything has to be Somewhere !!

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                          • #14
                            Just an update.. I continued to search for a foam cover that was 6' long to make installation even easier. Here is what I found. Gave a sample of the Gray AP cover to two different manufacturers at a trade show for analysis. Both agreed it was some kind of urethane foam, not pure urethane with a Shore A hardness of around 40. One could produce a urethane cover which sounded similar to the AP covers But again only in 3' lengths. The other could make a 6' urethane cover, ( I'm guessing this was the more conventional urethane similar to the red covers). However the cost was $384.00 each or $307.00 each for quantities of 16 or more with an upfront one time engineering charge of $1376.00 !!!! Brunswick cost per pair is about $200.00 Oh well...... I will continue to install the two pieces of the AP cover as they are very easy to install using the Clear Guide.

                            I also got an education on why some of the older urethane buckets and guide rollers failed so catastrophically. He basically explained that there are two different processes whereby the urethane separates or "reverts" back to its original components over time, and BOOM !! orange pieces everywhere from the rollers, and the buckets essentially fell apart after about 20 years. You could tear the bucket right off its mountings and rip the bucket apart with your bare hands. This is influenced by temperature, humidity, chemicals, etc. You've been warned !! LOL
                            Everything has to be Somewhere !!

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