Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

.262 scale pinsetter project

Collapse

Adsense Classic 1

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • .262 scale pinsetter project

    Came across this .262 scale pinsetter project on YouTube, really neat!!

    http://youtu.be/6IKMFkPOTtE
    Check out my YouTube videos: http://www.youtube.com/cmp128

  • #2
    Now that's a cool video. Hope he adds more information about his machine.

    Comment


    • #3
      Once you get onto his site, click on his name and you'll get three more vids. Two of them show his table setting pins, and the other shows him turning out his pins.
      AMF DOCTOR
      The doctor makes house calls.
      http://s427.photobucket.com/home/AMFDOCTOR/index

      Comment


      • #4
        That is awesome!! Now, all he has to do is mass produce them as a kit and sell them!! Nice to have access to all that equipment!!
        --- SteveJT66

        82/70's,kickers,Kegel Kustodian

        Comment


        • #5
          That is after he increases the size of all the parts.

          Comment


          • #6
            Yeah, I know what u mean, i'd love a half scale one, but if no one builds one to half scale, then I'd take his size setter and make a table top game.....!
            --- SteveJT66

            82/70's,kickers,Kegel Kustodian

            Comment


            • #7
              Very cool!
              www.BasementBowling.com

              Comment


              • #8
                UPDATE: The .262 scale pinsetter is another step closer to being fully functioning. The distributor works, just has to be fully automated for the indexing, right now he has to push a button and it moves. Can't wait to see this all done!!!!! Very cool....may be some ideas here for the1/2 scaler pinsetter builders....

                Here is the link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wTFGO...hannel&list=UL
                --- SteveJT66

                82/70's,kickers,Kegel Kustodian

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Stevejt66 View Post
                  UPDATE: The .262 scale pinsetter is another step closer to being fully functioning. The distributor works, just has to be fully automated for the indexing, right now he has to push a button and it moves. Can't wait to see this all done!!!!! Very cool....may be some ideas here for the1/2 scaler pinsetter builders....

                  Here is the link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wTFGO...hannel&list=UL
                  Thanks for posting this, Steve! I caught it a few weeks ago when he first put it out! Very impressive indeed and a lot can be learned from it!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Pretty nice setup, he's moving along on his pinsetter. I sent him a private message on youtube asking him to join Bowltech about 6 weeks ago, I never received a response.
                    Last edited by theultimateandy; 06-04-2012, 06:36 PM.
                    If it can't be fixed with a hammer, try a bowling pin! They're heavier and more surface area for whacking!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Ahhh,,,u were keeping it a secret there Jimmy, right? LOLOLOL It is cool, a combination of the Brunswick A series, and the AMF pinspotters.
                      --- SteveJT66

                      82/70's,kickers,Kegel Kustodian

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hey there Andy, thanks for the invite over to this forum. I've been pretty busy with all sorts of things, so updates here will be pretty sporadic, but I promise that I'll keep folk here up to date on how the project progresses.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Awesome frobzwiththingz, glad to see you made it on here. You have some really neat things going on with your pinspotter! Can't wait to see what else you come up with.
                          If it can't be fixed with a hammer, try a bowling pin! They're heavier and more surface area for whacking!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            An introduction. Hello all out there at Bowl-Tech. My name is Phil, and i'm the person posting the videos on Youtube documenting
                            (sporadically and with poor video quality) my progress building a pinsetter (and lane, eventually) at .262 scale. Some background; I
                            have been a software engineer (mostly networking protocols and embedded systems, with an early stint building Cad/Cam systems) for a
                            quarter century. Currently on hiatus from full time software jobs and mostly building circus equipment and teaching folk aerial circus arts,
                            as well as one-off custom fabrication contracts. The miniature pinsetter thing has been a project I've had in the back of my mind
                            since, well, forever. As a kid, I owned many small bowling simulation games, but of course none of them had a pinsetter. I always wondered
                            why there wasn't such a thing, not having any idea at the time just how complicated such a system would be. Anyhow, fast forward 40 years,
                            and I find myself thinking about it again, only now, I have a full machine shop in my basement, 3 home-built CNC machines, and plenty of
                            experience with electronics, embedded software, welding, and what not. The project once too ridiculous to think about, hey, it seems
                            like it would be totally within range now.

                            So, I started. I stumbled across Mark Luebeck's "A2 Project", and was glad to see that I'm not the only one to try it.

                            Like Mark, I originally had in mind the idea of doing a scale model of an "A" or "A2" brunswick machine; the classic workhorse. But after
                            staring at the A2 factory manual for a while, the insanity of that path struck hard. Scaling down most of the stuff in there would be a
                            nightmare! And it seemed to me to be overly complex mechanically, for this day and age, when we have sensors and microcontrollers. So, once
                            the idea of a replica A2 was tossed, I decided that the was no real point in duplicating *any* of the commercial machines out
                            there. Instead, I was going to take a different tack. The goal became to design and build a machine that was as mechanically *simple* as
                            possible, while still maintaining as much functionality as reasonable. I don't need to be able to set a rack every 9 seconds, but
                            i would like a fully functional machine, with some extras that aren't in any of the commercial offerings out there. [more on this in a
                            bit.].

                            So the pin deck, and scissor functionality is very much like the A/A2. It's simple, and scales down nicely. But I tossed out the
                            turret, in favor of a distributor more like an AMF machine. But not quite like an AMF either. My distributor stays level all the time,
                            rather than moving with the deck. There is no complicated pulley system to handle making the belt arm longer and shorter; instead the
                            entire distributor arm moves back and forth, poking out from behind the pinwheel at the back of the machine. The distributor system is
                            indexed like a CNC machine, driven by stepper motors, so complete random access is possible. This means that I will be able to tell the
                            pinsetter things like: "Hey, for the next 10 frames, just set me 6-7-10 splits to practice on, OK?"

                            No turret means that I can't quickly reset after a successive strikes, but as I said, speed is the first thing I'm willing to sacrifice in
                            the design. The distributor not moving with the deck means I cannot be feeding pins when a respot or rack set is occurring, so I need to have
                            control over when the pinwheel and distributor belt are running, but having all of these under computer (microcontroller) control makes
                            this easy without any added mechanical complexity.

                            About that ".262". Where does that come from? It's the ratio of the diameter of a standard international billiard ball to the diameter of
                            a ten-pin bowling ball. That way I don't have to make my own spheres; bowling balls for my lane will be cheap, plentiful, and available in
                            many different color schemes.

                            I wasn't thinking too much about automatic scoring, but seeing as Compy is building OpenScore, I'll almost definitely use it.

                            Anyhow, so far the project is going along pretty well. I have yet to want to throw the whole thing against a brick wall, though I am
                            finding some things to be harder than I expected. Some things have also been easier, though.

                            I will be putting up a few more videos fairly soon.

                            Until then, happy start of summer to you all, and i'll be happy to answer any questions.

                            -Phil

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by frobzwiththingz View Post
                              An introduction. Hello all out there at Bowl-Tech. My name is Phil, and i'm the person posting the videos on Youtube documenting
                              (sporadically and with poor video quality) my progress building a pinsetter (and lane, eventually) at .262 scale. Some background; I
                              have been a software engineer (mostly networking protocols and embedded systems, with an early stint building Cad/Cam systems) for a
                              quarter century. Currently on hiatus from full time software jobs and mostly building circus equipment and teaching folk aerial circus arts,
                              as well as one-off custom fabrication contracts. The miniature pinsetter thing has been a project I've had in the back of my mind
                              since, well, forever. As a kid, I owned many small bowling simulation games, but of course none of them had a pinsetter. I always wondered
                              why there wasn't such a thing, not having any idea at the time just how complicated such a system would be. Anyhow, fast forward 40 years,
                              and I find myself thinking about it again, only now, I have a full machine shop in my basement, 3 home-built CNC machines, and plenty of
                              experience with electronics, embedded software, welding, and what not. The project once too ridiculous to think about, hey, it seems
                              like it would be totally within range now.

                              So, I started. I stumbled across Mark Luebeck's "A2 Project", and was glad to see that I'm not the only one to try it.

                              Like Mark, I originally had in mind the idea of doing a scale model of an "A" or "A2" brunswick machine; the classic workhorse. But after
                              staring at the A2 factory manual for a while, the insanity of that path struck hard. Scaling down most of the stuff in there would be a
                              nightmare! And it seemed to me to be overly complex mechanically, for this day and age, when we have sensors and microcontrollers. So, once
                              the idea of a replica A2 was tossed, I decided that the was no real point in duplicating *any* of the commercial machines out
                              there. Instead, I was going to take a different tack. The goal became to design and build a machine that was as mechanically *simple* as
                              possible, while still maintaining as much functionality as reasonable. I don't need to be able to set a rack every 9 seconds, but
                              i would like a fully functional machine, with some extras that aren't in any of the commercial offerings out there. [more on this in a
                              bit.].

                              So the pin deck, and scissor functionality is very much like the A/A2. It's simple, and scales down nicely. But I tossed out the
                              turret, in favor of a distributor more like an AMF machine. But not quite like an AMF either. My distributor stays level all the time,
                              rather than moving with the deck. There is no complicated pulley system to handle making the belt arm longer and shorter; instead the
                              entire distributor arm moves back and forth, poking out from behind the pinwheel at the back of the machine. The distributor system is
                              indexed like a CNC machine, driven by stepper motors, so complete random access is possible. This means that I will be able to tell the
                              pinsetter things like: "Hey, for the next 10 frames, just set me 6-7-10 splits to practice on, OK?"

                              No turret means that I can't quickly reset after a successive strikes, but as I said, speed is the first thing I'm willing to sacrifice in
                              the design. The distributor not moving with the deck means I cannot be feeding pins when a respot or rack set is occurring, so I need to have
                              control over when the pinwheel and distributor belt are running, but having all of these under computer (microcontroller) control makes
                              this easy without any added mechanical complexity.

                              About that ".262". Where does that come from? It's the ratio of the diameter of a standard international billiard ball to the diameter of
                              a ten-pin bowling ball. That way I don't have to make my own spheres; bowling balls for my lane will be cheap, plentiful, and available in
                              many different color schemes.

                              I wasn't thinking too much about automatic scoring, but seeing as Compy is building OpenScore, I'll almost definitely use it.

                              Anyhow, so far the project is going along pretty well. I have yet to want to throw the whole thing against a brick wall, though I am
                              finding some things to be harder than I expected. Some things have also been easier, though.

                              I will be putting up a few more videos fairly soon.

                              Until then, happy start of summer to you all, and i'll be happy to answer any questions.

                              -Phil

                              Welcome aboard Phil! I love the design, and I love that you've progressed so far with things! I smell some potential Q-bowling action going on here!

                              What are you using to control the machine? Are you using an embedded microcontroller or are you interfacing with a PC? Keep us posted! I can't wait to see more! I hope to have OpenScore released here pretty soon as we're wrapping up some alpha testing with a small group.

                              -- Jimmy

                              Comment

                              Adsense Classic 2

                              Collapse
                               

                              phoenix rebuild

                              phoenix lane machine we got from another of our centers
                              seems like pms were not done in a long time
                              and these are just some of the pics
                               

                              Ball accelerator

                              Hello, would this crack in the accelerator motor cause an issue. It's brand new and have one on the way but, it won't be here until next week. I have a pair down due to the motor...
                               

                              Testing Link Belting "PowerTwist Drive"

                              Recently got my hands onto some meters of these: http://www.fennerdrives.com/powertwi...Drive-A/13/4L/

                              At first let me tell you that they are pretty sturdy and very...
                               

                              Ion buffer brush

                              Have Kegel ion model B. Noticed the buffer brush rubbing up against the felt that's attached to the oil transfer assembly (the "door" you open to fill the tanks). This...
                               

                              Preventative Maintenace - Brunswick A, Jets, A2 - Slow Machine - Semi Creepy Speed

                              I really liked the slower speed of Masternut but decided to go a little faster, (the M2SC Conversion - Mickey Mouse Semi Creepy Conversion LOL). Looking at the video on the...
                              Working...
                              X