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  • Front roller

    Have a couple front rolles needing rebuilt but I can only get half of the bolts out.The ones still in are rounded out {allen head}.Can I drill em out or use easy outs?

  • #2
    Re: Front roller

    Mechman the easiest way is to weld a nut to the top of the bolt and the use a wrench. Or you can drill them out like you said but if I remember they are real hard and have lock tight on them so if you use an easy out be real carful that you don't break the easy out.
    They say that the **** rolls down hill but the smell always starts at the top.

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    • #3
      Re: Front roller

      Lafarge is correct!!

      Rounded out Allen head bolts are easily taken out. Just weld a nut to them. If they are not rounded out to bad. Heat them up before you try and loosen them.
      Even a old dog can bury a bone

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      • #4
        Re: Front roller

        Remember, in the first place, you must smack them hard with a hammer before trying to back them out, and maybe they'll come out the first time.

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        • #5
          Re: Front roller

          I inherated these rollers in this condition from the previous head mech.The bolts that are out were heated up with a torch,by me to break them loose.I will try to weld nuts on them but not sure if the setup I have will work.

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          • #6
            Re: Front roller

            EZ-out bits will usually strip before they break the screw free... never had much luck with them.

            You will pretty much need a MIG or a stick welder to put nuts on them... brazing is too weak, and welding them with a gas torch make so much heat spread that you will warp or weaken the metal around the head of the screw. You need to get a strong weld with good penetration, with a minimum of residual heat to prevent warping or bonding of the surrounding metal.

            If they're really stuck, I'll drill the head of the screw off to get everything apart, soak the stuck screw with Liquid Wrench or PB B'laster for a few days, heat it a bit, then try to grab the remaining thread with a pair of vise-grips and turn it out. If that fails, I'll clamp it in the drill press, drill through with a bit slightly smaller than the bolt (to preserve the threads), pull out what I can with a hardened pick, then run a bottoming tap down to cut the rest free and dress the threads back into shape.

            Sometimes you can get them out by cutting a groove across them with a cutting wheel (like a Dremel), then using an impact gun with a hardened slotted bit to spin them free.

            Whatever method works, it's still a project. We made it a point to use anti-seize on the new bolts to prevent them from binding up in the future. To keep them from spinning out, we put green "Slip Fit" Lock-tite around the flute of the screw where it meets the roller half so the neck and flute of the screw is what is being held in place (not the threads). Then when they need to be gotten out the next time, I just warm them up with a regular plumbing torch enough to release the loc-tite, and spin them free.
            <span style="font-style: italic">Educatio est omnium efficacissima forma rebellionis</span>

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            • #7
              Re: Front roller

              Just curious. I have always ground off the sharp edges of the nyloc screws after rebuilding a front roller. I have recently encountered a few people who deem this a waste of time. Personaly I think replacing a shreaded carpet would have to waste more time, but I would be interested in hearing what others here do.

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              • #8
                Re: Front roller

                Originally posted by JimDorsin:
                Just curious. I have always ground off the sharp edges of the nyloc screws after rebuilding a front roller.
                <font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">We do the same... the edges of the screws are dressed prevent damage to the back of the carpet. Takes about a minute to do. It's just my opinion, but I think the carpet tracks better without the screw edges sticking up as well.
                <span style="font-style: italic">Educatio est omnium efficacissima forma rebellionis</span>

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                • #9
                  Re: Front roller

                  You have to grind or file down the new screws after you install them to match the conture of the roller. If you don't, the screw heads will chew up the inside of the carpet.
                  &quot;Gun control is the policy of tyrants&quot;
                  Rep. Rob Bishop (R-UT)

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                  • #10
                    Re: Front roller

                    I also grind off front roller screws after a rebuild and I always replace the screws with new ones.

                    I also use some emery to sand the surface of the front and rear roller surface. This will prevent the a new carpet belt from slipping during breakin especially one that came out of the shipping container.
                    Dr. James Bandy,D.D. HCLS
                    <a href="http://bowlingpin.cjb.net/Techs/aboutme.htm" target="_blank"><a href="http://bowlingpin.cjb.net/Techs/aboutme.htm" target="_blank"><a href="http://bowlingpin.cjb.net/Techs/aboutme.htm" target="_blank"><a href="http://bowlingpin.cjb.net/Techs/aboutme.htm" target="_blank"><a href="http://bowlingpin.cjb.net/Techs/aboutme.htm" target="_blank"><a href="http://bowlingpin.cjb.net/Techs/aboutme.htm" target="_blank"><a href="http://bowlingpin.cjb.net/Techs/aboutme.htm" target="_blank"><a href="http://bowlingpin.cjb.net/Techs/aboutme.htm" target="_blank"><a href="http://bowlingpin.cjb.net/Techs/aboutme.htm" target="_blank">http://bowlingpin.cjb.net/Techs/aboutme.htm</a></a></a></a></a></a></a></a></a>

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                    • #11
                      Re: Front roller

                      3M spray adheasive also works well for the rear roller.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Front roller

                        I have always been able to get the screws out by first hitting it squarely with a large ball peen and then using a high quality center punch. Just left of center hit it squarely and then then tilt the center punch no more than 20 degrees and hit it hard and it will move. If the center punch slips and makes a 'comet tale', re-sharpen the punch and make a new indent. If that fails, use a 5/16 tap with a point on it and that will move it, but remember no more than a 20 degree angle when hitting the bolt. I learned this kind of stuff by working in a machine shop all my life.
                        Yeah but, We've always done it that way.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Front roller

                          I’ve always used extreme heat to remove the bolts. Back in the old days (1970’s) I was taught to use (but not anymore) red locktite to assemble the front rollers. This was because carpets were around $300 (which was a lot of money back then) and we did not take any chance of ruining this carpet. Heat was the only option, as this stuff is about as permanent as you can get next to welding.

                          When a head gets rounded, I will braze a ¼” (7/16” head) bolt to the hole. It fits snug in the hole and less chance of the brass tacking the allen bolt to the body. The heat generated to get the brass to stick will be more than enough to turn it out with very little force while still very hot. I’ve even showed my guys this by using a pair of regular pliers to turn this brazed bolt while still hot…but they are to stubborn and insist on doing it the hard way and end up breaking wrenches and rounding out the holes.

                          As for a broken head…I drill a hole in the bolt stud, heat it up and twist it out with an easy out. The extreme heat will soften the stud enough to allow the easy out to really bite as well as expand the hole (and liquefy the locktite)…but the heat softens the hardness of the easy out and it should not be used again.

                          BTW…I’ve always rounded the protruding edges of the allen bolts flush to the body.
                          Even though I’ve seen some bolts that were not rounded and did not damage the carpet…old habits die hard.

                          Triac

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                          • #14
                            Re: Front roller

                            I grind mine down. I use a chissel and hammer to get the stripped ones. [img]/content/btubb/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/usflag.jpg[/img]
                            SGT
                            U.S. Army/AVN
                            Retired

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                            • #15
                              Re: Front roller

                              I like Wacking'em really hard...
                              Then with a regular allen, I put my large cresent wrench (handle side or hole side) over the allen and turn them out with ease.
                              If at first you don't succeed, try, try, again. Then quit. There's no use being a damn fool about it.&quot; -W.C.Fields

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