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  • Solid state switchs

    On my 82-70 I put solid state on the combo moters I got them from bowlmaster my chassis are solid state, w/expander When I put the switch on the sweep and changed the wiring under the chassis for sweep reverse it runs the way it should with the expander but when I run sweep rev. from mechanics control the mian breaker kicks ?? But the sweep will reverse with the expander if you get a gutter ball It makes no sense to me.

  • #2
    Re: Solid state switchs

    What kind of solid state switches are they??Sounds like it may be wired wrong.Info on the switches and how you wired them would be helpful.sorry I dont have any thing else right off the top of my head

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Solid state switchs

      I would highly recomend eliminating the ss switch and go to a potential relay. The price isnt much different, and they are much more reliable.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Solid state switchs

        It won't be the start switch that is the problem (because the sweep works). It will be the sweep reverse modification to the wiring that is wrong.

        Recheck the wiring changes that you made, and double-check that the instructions match your previous setup (e.g. did you have previous modification for expander or another brand of start switch?).

        I am not familiar with the bowlmaster wiring so I can't say specifically what would make this happen, but the problem is likely to be where the wires from the sweep reverse switch are terminated. If you could post a link to the instructions/diagram, or tell us how you wired it up, we could possibly help further.

        Cheers,
        Andrew.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Solid state switchs

          If this SSSS is a Quality brand or a Quality clone…you need to follow the directions for the MP chassis.

          Triac

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Solid state switchs

            Originally posted by JimDorsin:
            I would highly recomend eliminating the ss switch and go to a potential relay. The price isnt much different, and they are much more reliable.
            <font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Your most intelligent and insightful post ever.

            [img]/content/btubb/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/143.gif[/img]

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            • #7
              Re: Solid state switchs

              lol thank you Jerry

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              • #8
                Re: Solid state switchs

                The potential relays work real well and last a long time. The only problem I’ve had with them is that when they do go, occasionally they will melt the receptacle and short the windings out.

                Triac

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Solid state switchs

                  which one are you using? Granger sells a vast amount of ratings on those. I have yet to have one do any damage (going on 3 years now)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Solid state switchs

                    Dunno….These ones (in question) were going longer than 10 years and did some serious damage when they went.

                    Triac

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                    • #11
                      Re: Solid state switchs

                      Why not use a SS one that doesn't need any modification to the machinewiring? You can then use every motor on any lane, sweep or table.
                      If a machine doesn't want to be fixed, it will let you know. Over and over again!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Solid state switchs

                        Originally posted by 82/30 king:
                        </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by JimDorsin:
                        I would highly recomend eliminating the ss switch and go to a potential relay. The price isnt much different, and they are much more reliable.
                        <font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Your most intelligent and insightful post ever.

                        [img]/content/btubb/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/143.gif[/img]
                        </font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">So what exactly is the difference between a solid state switch and a potential relay?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Solid state switchs

                          Originally posted by JimDorsin:
                          I would highly recomend eliminating the ss switch and go to a potential relay. The price isnt much different, and they are much more reliable.
                          <font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">100% agree with JimDorsin. I've only got a handful of Cent switches/mechs left. No problems on the potential relays (6X550 from Grainger, BTW). The cost of one relay is cheaper than the boards which the points burn up in no time. (Westinghouse) If a relay goes bad, it's easily changed out in under 1 minute.
                          "Where are we going, and why are we in a hand basket?"

                          --Kat

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Solid state switchs

                            Originally posted by WAHSAM:
                            </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by 82/30 king:
                            </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by JimDorsin:
                            I would highly recomend eliminating the ss switch and go to a potential relay. The price isnt much different, and they are much more reliable.
                            <font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Your most intelligent and insightful post ever.

                            [img]/content/btubb/images/%%GRAEMLIN_URL%%/143.gif[/img]
                            </font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">So what exactly is the difference between a solid state switch and a potential relay?
                            </font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">The potential relay is still a switch that opens and closes. A solid state start switch has no movement. Its all done with solid state devices for switching. With westinghouse motors, SSSS have a tendancy to cost on combos. A potential relay doesnt coast because it has a set of contacts inside. Its easier to change out a potential relay then it is a set of contacts on the terminal board as everything is inside the little black box.

                            Wang

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Solid state switchs

                              For me, 'Solid State' means: no relays, no contacts, no burning in, no worries! It's all electronic. Mine are working fine for 13 years now. There's a little plug on them. If I ever have to replace one it will take about 4 seconds.

                              If a machine doesn't want to be fixed, it will let you know. Over and over again!

                              Comment

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