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  • Table drive shaft tale

    Yesterday, I replaced my first table drive bearing. This summer, my project is to go through all the combi's and re-build them and paint them. Shift the gearing round 90 degree's, replace oil seals and gasgets, grease the splines etc...

    I had to replace the bearing that was next to the gear box as had totally disintigrated.
    I put wood under the table at spotting.
    Removed the spot and re-spot springs.
    removed the light ( for more room to get into the locking collar)
    Loosen off the locking collar, by loosening the grub screw and turning the collar to un-lock it.
    remove the three bolts (allen heads) and knock out the bearing holder unit. The bearing is self aligning, so you just need to flip it so it lies horizontal and then it will slide out the housing. I removed the light so that I could pull up on the re-spot lever to allow room to tighten up the locking collar on replaced of the housing.
    The shaft did move a hell of a lot when it came off though?! Was a bit worrying, but hey, all was well in the end.

    Some lanes had a plate in place instead of the second housing. I personally think that two bearings is best, but you probably don't need two at all! In fact you blatently don't!
    At first, when I saw the plate, I was like that. "lazy, lazy bugger....."
    I thought that it was some sort of lazy mans mod before me, but then a looked closely in the manual and all was clear

    Don't fancy changing the one next to the table drive unit though??
    Bring me the freshest "Mean Green" known to man! Juice on!

  • #2
    Re: Table drive shaft tale

    I don't know the year they started doing it but newer machines only have the bearing by the table drive. I just got to change my first one ever on Wednesday. Went to a friends center to fill in while he is out of town and it was waiting for me. Ended up changing out the entire table shaft and cams. It really wasn't too bad of a job. He had a shaft built up with the cams and bearing ready to go. It took me about 4 hours to do but I didn't rush. Wanted to make sure I did it right.

    Pete

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    • #3
      Re: Table drive shaft tale

      Originally posted by Alastair:
      I thought that it was some sort of lazy mans mod before me, but then a looked closely in the manual and all was clear
      <font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">i thought CHEAP mech before me. figured it was a way for a previous mech to score free spare swivel bearing &amp; housing

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      • #4
        Re: Table drive shaft tale

        The bearing and housing next to the gearbox are both different than the one next to the table drive. Many of our machines have both bearings.

        The bearing next to the g/box has a flat edge where as the other one is rounded. Also, the housing for it next to the g/box is deeper and the bearing goes straight in where as the other one is shallow and the bearing must be inserted at a 90 deg. angle into the "cut outs" then rotated once in.

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        • #5
          Re: Table drive shaft tale

          Ah, ... Now in the clear light of day...I forgot to menchion that the only bearing I could find for replacement was one which came out of a smaller housing (the one which sits next to the table drive). This one I had to swivel and pull out. The housing beside the gearbox is larger and the bearing just slots in without having to turn it around 90 degrees, as pointed out by tablejam.
          Bring me the freshest "Mean Green" known to man! Juice on!

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          • #6
            Re: Table drive shaft tale

            Some lanes had a plate in place instead of the second housing. I personally think that two bearings is best, but you probably don't need two at all! In fact you blatently don't!
            At first, when I saw the plate, I was like that. "lazy, lazy bugger....."
            I thought that it was some sort of lazy mans mod

            [/QB][/QUOTE]

            Carl Clark, who was a long time AMF service rep , once told me the AMF engineers thought the problem with broken table drive shafts were compounded by the bearing near the table motor.(reasoning at the time was that the bearing made the shaft too rigid). The intention of removing the bearing, and installing the plate , was to allow the shaft to " flex " slightly near the shuttle cam area.
            There is light at the end of the tunnel - just be sure it is not a train.

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            • #7
              Re: Table drive shaft tale

              The bearing next to the motor is not self-aligning. You're best off eliminating it, but you need to check alignment of the gearbox cage to the other bearing.
              There is considerable amount of play in the motor mounting holes. If you put a shaft in and align the right end plate/bearing with the two shoulder screws, and before locking the collar, you are not able to easily slide the shaft left &amp; right in the gearbox spline, then the gearbox is NOT lined up with the self-aligning bearing at the table drive. You must loosen the gearbox and try different positions (long prybar works great here) by raising the front or the rear, or the entire gearbox and snugging the bolts each time until you get free movement.
              If unsuccessful, then you must go the route they used at the factory at the time of assembly:
              1. Remove the self-aligning bearing plate.
              2. Drill new 3/16" holes in the plate near the original 1/4" guide holes.
              3. Reinstall the bearing and shaft, using only the (3) 5/16-18 bolts, firmly snugging them. (If shuttle operator is not on the machine at this time, leave it off for now and use shorter bolts for the two forward holes).
              4. If the shaft is not free laterally, as described before, loosen the 3 bolts slightly and move the plate around until you accomplish alignment.
              5. Once aligned, tighten the 3 bolts and drill 3/16" holes into the crossbeam frame, using the holes you drilled in the plate as a guide. Keep it straight!
              6. Enlarge the holes to 1/4" while the plate is tight. Mark these new holes as the ones to be used on that machine. I usually scribe an arrow in the plate.
              7. Install the shoulder screws, remove the two front bolts, install the shuttle operator, and carry on.

              This, of course, works for the sweep side as well.

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              • #8
                Re: Table drive shaft tale

                Very interesting and informative information guys.

                Thanks.
                Bring me the freshest "Mean Green" known to man! Juice on!

                Comment

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