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GS-X table bolts/stud

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  • GS-X table bolts/stud

    I know I'm not the only one who has had the table bolts literally shear off. I cannot explain where there would be a force strong enough to do this to the bolts.
    Other that replacing the bolts with threaded rod are welding them in. All my pinsetters are about 10 years old.

    1. Has anyone modified this section to prevent this from happening?
    2. Does anyone know what would cause this?

    Every table that i have had to replace them has not broken yet so i am starting to think that the steel rod/bolt they originally used is of "low quality"

    Interested to see what any mods might be.
    Thanks

    Attached Files

  • #2
    Grind it flush, punch out the stud and replace with carriage bolt. Make sure your guys aren’t kneeling on the table when replacing pin holders or doing maintenance.
    Keep an eye on it see if it does it again

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    • #3
      Originally posted by A-RON View Post
      Grind it flush, punch out the stud and replace with carriage bolt. Make sure your guys aren’t kneeling on the table when replacing pin holders or doing maintenance.
      That's what we have been doing to repair them. But this bolt shouldn't shear off like this

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by GCM_Techs View Post

        That's what we have been doing to repair them. But this bolt shouldn't shear off like this
        A-Ron's point is that undo stresses such as leaning or pulling on the table can cause issues that aren't accounted for in the design specs. Yes, it may be low grade material sometimes, but that is not always the case. Some point in the past, if the tables have been dropped because of OOR or Stroke Limiter issues, stresses will take a while to show up.
        I believe a one piece beef up plate with two bolt holes that goes through the table structure would also help keep things strong once new hardware is installed.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by loadtoad View Post

          A-Ron's point is that undo stresses such as leaning or pulling on the table can cause issues that aren't accounted for in the design specs. Yes, it may be low grade material sometimes, but that is not always the case. Some point in the past, if the tables have been dropped because of OOR or Stroke Limiter issues, stresses will take a while to show up.
          I believe a one piece beef up plate with two bolt holes that goes through the table structure would also help keep things strong once new hardware is installed.
          Any undo stress has to be coming from the machine itself because anyone one of our guys doing repairs would not kneel on the table. There is no advantage to doing that, trying to position your body under there is a challenge enough, finding a spot to "rest" without cutting or scraping yourself all to hell is even worse. Sure there may be times when you slip but there is no way this would stress these bolts.

          We have had a chain pivot bearings brake and the table fill fall but this has only happened to 2 machines over a 10 year period. Stroke limiter and OOR issues could be a small issue. We are a recreational center and have no leagues so we rarely hear about OOR because they are just ignored by the system (no error generated to the customer but it will show up in the error log file). The customer just figures it didn't score the fallen pins and play on. The odd time they will say something and we can correct the score.

          The Stroke limiter seal can and does go making the table not slow down when it is doing the pin detection cycle. We have noticed that when there is a stroke limiter issue and the table comes down fast it can sometimes cause the pins to be knocked over. Again, the customer probably wouldn't say anything.

          So i guess over time anything can really cause fatigue in the table studs. We don't have x-ray vision to see through the bolts. To me the break appears to be a shear type and not a tension type but whatever type the break is there would never be enough force made by the pinsetter to do this and therefore the bolts just wear over time.
          Just have to keep going forward and replace what breaks.....
          That's my little rant, hope i didn't tick anyone off

          Comment


          • #6
            I don't think your rant warrants pissing anyone off....we all know that stud breakages are annoying. With some places dealing more than others. Kind of like when there was a rash of pit cushion support shafts shearing that turned out to be a poor lot of steel a few years ago (if i remember correctly).

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