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Tip, on Detector disassembly

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  • Tip, on Detector disassembly

    There is something I see many mechanics doing when they disassemble detectors. Most mechanics, when removing the selectors and camfollowers take those brass washers (spacers) and just throw them to the side not taking in to consideration that those spacers are of different thicknesses, then when they are re-assembling the detector, they get that puzzled look about their faces as to where this thick spacer goes and to where this thin one goes. To aleviate this problem, when you remove a selector, take the spacers that go on either side of it, put them on their proper sides and run a piece of bailing wire through the selector and spacer and twist the end of the wire. This keeps the spacer on its proper side and there will be no question as to where to place the spacer during re-assembly. Placing a thick spacer where it does not go could cause a selector or camfollower to bind. I personally have rebuilt many detectors over the last 16 years
    and I still use this little helper, just thought I would share this with you all.

  • #2
    Re: Tip, on Detector disassembly

    The trick about the wire sounds good. I just did two detectors this past season and not much of a problem there. One question though at what point do you consider replacing the selectors and controlers? (expensive little parts aren't they). Also when is a good time to replace the cams themselves. Thanks Jack

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Tip, on Detector disassembly

      Lately, I have had 3 detectors in the past 4 months break the standing pins selector. About the last inch of the selector will break off causing the machine to stay in 2nd ball cycle all the time. I have A-2 converts where the camfollowers are toes rather than roller bearings. These are really holding up well, I'm surprised, and glad too. Yes, the parts are very expensive, I just spent $ 300.00 just getting these 4 parts,for one machine, and you do have to order another "B" shaft which you use this "B" shaft to replace the existing "A" shaft because you do not use the spacers anymore.
      I like the new modification. As far as replacing them? unless you are having problems with them, I'd leave them alone, my pinsetters are the 15,000 series and I havn't had a lick of a problem with the camfollowers
      yet. Just keep them lubricated.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Tip, on Detector disassembly

        I inherited some badly worn detectors (10 years of NO maintenance/lubrication). I check for wear by looking at where the strike latch contacts the blocking surface on the 180 stop selector. If it's down to half the latch, you should be looking to buy some parts, because it's going to start causing problems soon (if it hasn't already).

        This one is fairly easy to inspect, because it's right on top, and if the strike selector is worn, the other two aren't far behind.

        I've found that when fitting the new style shafts/selectors, that the spacer washers are still necessary in SOME cases, you should always check for proper centering of the selectors on the timing cam, and for clearance between the blocking surface on the selector and the detector disk. Variances in the assembly of the cams, bearings, and disk are the reasons for the spacers in the first place.

        Kevin

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        • #5
          Re: Tip, on Detector disassembly

          Kl;
          Well said.
          Covers it all.
          rfm

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Tip, on Detector disassembly

            You're absolutely right KL. I did forget to mention the fact that when you do change the shafts you are not going to get them pressed in exactly the same as the old one, which means either moving the shaft or using spacers. I have noticed too that most of the detectors that use the "toe" type camfollower
            tend not to wear evenly across the toe citing the need for spacers. Of course with the old style selectors you should have at least 1 spacer between them just for the purpose of
            the selector and camfollower not binding, thats a given. With the new ones though, I dont remember ever spacing them. If I'm not mistaking though KL, correct me if I'm wrong,
            with the new style that has the flanged oilite bearing that sticks out, you can make
            centering adjustments by either pressing that bearing in or out slightly but there is not much room to play with... Chuck

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Tip, on Detector disassembly

              Quote:]Originally posted by Charles Heuer:
              Lately, I have had 3 detectors in the past 4 months break the standing pins selector. About the last inch of the selector will break off causing the machine to stay in 2nd ball cycle all the time. I have A-2 converts where the camfollowers are toes rather than roller bearings. These are really holding up well, I'm surprised, and glad too. Yes, the parts are very expensive, I just spent $ 300.00 just getting these 4 parts,for one machine, and you do have to order another "B" shaft which you use this "B" shaft to replace the existing "A" shaft because you do not use the spacers anymore.
              I like the new modification. As far as replacing them? unless you are having problems with them, I'd leave them alone, my pinsetters are the 15,000 series and I havn't had a lick of a problem with the camfollowers
              yet. Just keep them lubricated.
              [/QUOTE]
              Its just a matter of time until something will go wrong.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Tip, on Detector disassembly

                I AGREE THAT THE CONTROLLERS W/TOES ARE GOOD BUT I HAVE CONVERTED ALL MINE TO ROLLER BEARINGS SO I DONT HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT LUBING THE CAMS AS OFTEN.ALSO I FOUND IF YOU USE SLICK 50 ON THE CAMS IT DOSENT DRIP ALL OVER THE CURTAINS ETC.I HAVE WORKED WITH MACHINES THAT HAD ROLLER BEARINGS AND NEVER HAD A BEARING FAIL.
                Its just a matter of time until something will go wrong.

                Comment

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