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  • Pinchaser Training

    Does anyone have a good checklist to use for pinchaser training. I have Brunswick A's
    Ricks Pro Shop

  • #2
    Re: Pinchaser Training

    Try the Brunswick forum best place to find that info.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Pinchaser Training

      Can't help you much with the Brunswick end of things, but I'll give you the things I would run through when breaking in a new pinnie. A lot of it depends on if they are currently a bowler or not, how mechanically inclined they are, and how bright they are... Some catch on quicker than others, and sometimes (if they bowl) they are already a little familiar with the machine cycles, pin spot locations, and such. You kind of have to tailor your new hire orientation to the person you are training.

      It looks like a long, drawn out process, but it's really not:

      Walk them through the building, show them where things are (bathroom, phone, office, etc...), and introduce them to the current staff.

      Go in the back, show them where the MSDS book is kept (and where it's supposed to remain when not in use), stress to them that when tools are used, they are to be put back where they were found, and briefly explain what their duties are. Show them the proper way to shut down a machine to work on it, and the locations of the circuit breakers (which are clearly marked). Stress that if they have a question or are ever unsure of something, to ASK.

      Ask if they have any questions.

      Go to a machine, have them stand BEHIND it (not on it), and begin to show them some basics of the machine components, "safe areas", "unsafe areas" (pinch points, voltage, moving components, etc...) with the machine OFF. Have them climb up on the machine, showing them safe places to step, where not to step, and what to watch out for. Explain the components of the backend control box, and what each item does.

      Run the machine through a couple cycles, explaining (briefly) machine operation and cycles.

      After they see the machine run, start pointing out areas that are hazardous (belt runs, moving components, etc..), and stress that there should be no loose clothing, long hair is tied up, no loose jewelry, etc...

      Ask if they have any questions.

      Show them how to drop the sweep (making sure no one is throwing a ball before doing so) and kill the machine to clear a jam, spot a pin, etc... with the sweep at guard. Allow them to spot a couple pins with the pin hook.

      Move to a running machine with bowlers on it (if possible), and explain addditional danger areas from pin/ball impact.

      Go up front, open a shur-pik, again go through safety, danger areas, voltage, pinch points, etc..., and how to work safely around the unit. Start up the lane and throw a few balls so they can see how the lift works.

      Ask if they have any questions.

      Return to the back, set up a few scenarios like pin jams, ball jams, belts off, etc..., and show them the correct and SAFE way to correct the problem. Again show them the hazard areas, disconnect plugs, etc...

      Usually after this, I would answer any other general questions they had, and then set them up to come in and work a shift or two with me, so they can see how things usually go during a league / open play. Once they catch on a bit, allow them to run the calls, watchin them, but letting them do the actual work, correcting where needed.

      If they seem to be catching on quickly, we will try them solo on an easier night first, if they still seem to need a bit of help with things, I'd have them come in with another pinchaser.

      For the first few weeks of them soloing, the owner or myself will check on them periodically and watch them to make sure they are following safety rules and doing their duties, ask if they have questions, and remind them that if they are not sure, to ask another pinchaser, the owner, or myself first.

      Again, it takes a while to build a relaible pinchaser... as long as they are shown the RIGHT and SAFE way right off, you can help them to add more skills as they get more experienced with the basics. A 'fully-trained' pinchaser at our place may take a season or more to get really 'good' at their job... but our pinchasers know how to replace cushions, combo motors, respot cells, chassis / boards, distributors, and ball lifts... besides the normal clearing of jams, spotting pins, and retrieving stuck balls.
      <span style="font-style: italic">Educatio est omnium efficacissima forma rebellionis</span>

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Pinchaser Training

        I think what he said is pretty good. Brunswick has a great video on A2's. You could use it for A's and just show them the difference.
        Kenneth Mullins
        [email protected]

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Pinchaser Training

          Originally posted by TheGMan143:
          Show them the proper way to shut down a machine to work on it, and the locations of the circuit breakers (which are clearly marked). .................

          Show them how to drop the sweep (making sure no one is throwing a ball before doing so) and kill the machine to clear a jam, spot a pin, etc... with the sweep at guard................


          Return to the back, set up a few scenarios like pin jams, ball jams, belts off, etc..., and show them the correct and SAFE way to correct the problem. Again show them the hazard areas, disconnect plugs, etc...

          <font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">With all that being said...and I am sure G was implying it but I will stress the point...the proper way to shut a machine off is to unplug it, place the plug in a lockout device and lock the device. If we teach them these in the begining...they will do them. They will follow your lead and if you don't use them from the very first day you are teaching them...they will not do it either.

          In another thread, G stated that having the devices does no good if you don't teach them how to be safe...and I agree with that philosophy 100%.
          TSM & TSM Training Development
          Main Event Entertainment
          480-620-6758 for help or information

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Pinchaser Training

            Here is the part number for the training video, they should watch it 2 times and sign a sheet saying they have watched it and understand the procedures and safety shown.

            I have a Pinchasing trainning book if you would like a copy.


            Video

            61-860227-000 Basic A-2 Pinsetter Operation
            Peanut

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Pinchaser Training

              We used to show every new employee the safety proceedures for the machines and how to crank a motor. As a last demo, I stopped the table and sweep in mid cycle with the table down and placed an empty pin box on the table and then turned it back on. As the table came up it crushes the box and makes a terrible sound. I told them that could be you if you don't use a lock out box. The look on their faces when I handed them the crushed box was priceless.
              &quot;Gun control is the policy of tyrants&quot;
              Rep. Rob Bishop (R-UT)

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Pinchaser Training

                In addition to showing new employees as much as I can and beating them about the head and body about SAFETY SAFETY SAFETY.... I have them read a few interesting articles I found on the net about some "experienced" technicians that were injured or even killed working on the machines to emphasize that safety is not to be taken lightly, and I ALWAYS have them shadow with an experienced person for at least a week before turning them loose on their own. I mentioned it before on here I even fired my own nephew because the fool believed that smoking pot and then working on my machines was "ok" and I did not want to ship home a corpse to my sister.
                &quot;ALL IN&quot;

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Pinchaser Training

                  ICC Retired, what do you think about using a Qual Card system like the Navy? I thought it worked extremely well, and it would ensure that each new employee is told, and learns, everything at least once. I don't know if you used Qual Cards or not, but I spent years and years with some sort of Qual Card in my back pocket trying like hell to get my knowledge tested and my card signed off.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Pinchaser Training

                    Interesting idea with the Qual Cards. How does that work in the situation you were in? Did you have to prove to someone in particular or was it anyone with a certain qualification could sign off? More explanation is needed.

                    Thanks...
                    TSM & TSM Training Development
                    Main Event Entertainment
                    480-620-6758 for help or information

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Pinchaser Training

                      What happens is that you are given a Qual Card for a specific watchstation or job. So, you might be qualifying as a Craftsman, or maybe as a Throttleman watch. There is a list of people that can sign each card. The cardsigner list is made up of highly qualified people that have proven themselves worthy of signing a Qual Card through technical knowledge level and professional achievement. The Qual Card itself has line items that represent some knowledge that must be obtained. It could be as simple as describing how something works, locations of equipment, etc. The idea is that everything that someone should know about a particular watchstation or job is contiained within a Qual Card. To obtain a signature on the card, one must fulfill the requirements of the line item. This can be done by demonstrating knowledge or by physically doing what the Navy called a "practical factor". When the entire card was completed, there was usually a series of oral boards which are given by very senior people, and the boards comprehensively test the knowledge for that particular Qual card. Once all of the signatures are obtained, and the oral boards are passed, then you have another very high ranking person sign off on your qualification and your qualification is entered into a List of Qualified Watchstanders, or you get a job qualification in your record. It is a long and tedious process, but it turns high school kids into very highly skilled and competent operators.

                      In a bowling center, the responsibility for checking and "signing off" on a line item would probably lie exclusively with the head mechanic. Cross knowledge about front end operations may be signed off by the general manager, or a front end trainer. The final qualification signature could come from the General Manager, or maybe a Regional Manager depending on the size and scope of your respective company. The main point with all of this is that there would be documented, specific knowledge that everyone should know. You could have a Qual Card for your type of lane machine, another for the pinsetters, another for pulling and reading lane tapes, safety precautions associated with pinsetters, and so on. It doesn't have to be elaborate, but it can be comprehensive, documented, and accountable for the knowledge that you want everyone in the company to have. If a governing body was established for mechanics, then they could even come up with the Qual Cards and distribute them to head mechanics. They could determine whether or not a head mechanic possesses enough knowledge to be certified as a card signer. People in qualifications could be required to do a phone interview or teleconference as their final oral board to become certified. Or, they could actually go to a testing center to become certified. There could be quarterly or semi-annual test dates in which everyone who is ready to advance will have to show up and prove their knowledge through oral boards, written exams, and hands on exercises to prove their worthiness in advancing to the next level. There is so much that can be done with this system, but it is only one way. I am sure that there are many others, and hopefully we can determine the best way for bowling center mechanics to move forward with the highest standards of professional knowledge and achievement possible.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Pinchaser Training

                        One more thing to touch on is that this system makes everyone in the chain of command accountable for the qualification of a new mechanic. More specifically, when a senior person signs off on your qualification, they are saying that they stand behind you, and they know that you will act responsibly and professionally in all situations. For example, if you have a Safety Qual Card that covers lockout boxes, then when everyone signs off on the qualification, they are saying that they know that you will always use the lockout boxes in accordance with the safety procedures that have been set forth in the company. This is a powerful idea. In the Navy, I was certified by the Commanding Officer himself for a couple of my highest qualifications. In doing so, it held him accountable for my actions. I actually had to do the final oral board with him because he had to know first hand that I was ready to take on the responsibility of my new qualification. It sounds crazy, but it is true. If I made a big mistake, then he would pay an extremely high penalty. Even losing his command. The stakes are usually not as high in bowling centers, but we have seen and heard many stories about mechanics being injured and killed. We can never train enough, and we can never know all that we need to know.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Pinchaser Training

                          I have about 4 of Brunswicks video's and it would be nice if we could find a way to put them on this site for viewing. It would be great for newbies and I think all could benefit from it, since we would not be selling it I don't see any problems but I am sure Mike knows more about that one.
                          Drill

                          David Bolt
                          Champaign, IL
                          USBC Silver Coach
                          IBPSIA BOD
                          IBPSIA Advanced
                          Technical Certified
                          Pro Shops

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Pinchaser Training

                            Generaly 'rebroadcasting in any form' is still considered a copyright infringment, but it would be an awsome idea if there was a legal way to do it. I would wonder if maybe BRunz. may give consent?? might be worth following up on.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Pinchaser Training

                              Along the lines of Drills idea...what if we made our own video? Then there would be no copyright issues. We could fashion them along the lines of the Brunswick versions or we could just come up with our own. Wouldn't have to be professionally done I don't think. Just somebody with a camcorder and a script...both machine types to use as examples and start rolling. What do you think?
                              TSM & TSM Training Development
                              Main Event Entertainment
                              480-620-6758 for help or information

                              Comment

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